Friday, January 7, 2011

Where do ladybugs go in the winter?

Ladybugs have relatively long life spans compared to many insects. The go through their remarkable transformation from egg to larvae to pupa to adult in about one month, but they can live for a couple of years as an adult. Thus they have to adapt to all the seasons of the year.

Have you ever wondered where ladybugs go in the winter?

Insects are cold-blooded. This means their bodies are roughly the same temperature as their surroundings. And when the temperature drops below freezing it can be deadly for insects unless they can find a way to adjust.
Ladybugs usually survive the cold by hibernating. When the temperature drops their body functions slow down and they go to sleep, not to wake again until it gets warmer. But they also seek shelter to reduce their exposure to the cold. They often hide under bark or leaves or find crevices in trees or rock. And they like to gather in clusters for additional protection. These ladybug clusters can consist of just a few ladybugs or thousands of them. How they find each other and what determines the size and location of a cluster are interesting questions. Scientists have studied this behavior and come to . some interesting conclusions. Click here to read their conclusions. 

Ladybug also can survive the cold winter by inviting themselves into homes. While a few ladybug guests can be a pleasant surprise, a few thousand at a time can be a little much. If you want to rid yourself of these uninvited guests you may want to try these non-toxic ladybug removal methods. A nice way to store a mixture of dishwashing liquid and water to help with the de-ladybugging process is in a Mollie Ladybug Spray Bottle,

10 comments:

rollercoaster said...

If I find a ladybug in my home during winter and want it to survive until Spring, what should I do?

Anonymous said...

Feed them raisins and put them in a bug catcher with plants and watch.

Anonymous said...

Place a moist cotton ball and a drop of honey on a small dish (dessert plate) in the room you find them in. He/she will travel about but return to the plate for the water and honey.

Anonymous said...

Leave the ladybug where it is. It will find a place in your home to keep warm until it warms up outside.

Anonymous said...

u have 2 now in a bowl with flowers grass ..nectar

Ned Winter said...

When I find one I put it in my indoor plants until it warms up outside then release it. I spray the leaves with water so they have a water source while inside.

Ned Winter said...

I put them in my indoor plants until it warms up then release outside. I spray the leaves with water so they have a water source.

Ned Winter said...

Provide water until it warms up outside and put in your indoor plants

Beatrice Della Musea said...

Hi.. In February 2015, found about 20 Ladybugs in a farm loft apartment.. So they've been in a plastic container ( 10" x 6" x 6" ~ washed out daily and dried. I simply remove ( I use a folded piece of coffee filter as a sort of gentle scoop to pick up the bugs to move them..) the bugs to another container during the cleanup).its nearly the end of April in Ontario, and soon these pretty little insects can fly free. Each day, two or three sprigs of organic greens, (lettuce ) along with 2-3 small chunks of organic apple or pear are placed in with the bugs. I tried the soaked raisins as has been suggested, but given a choice, Ladybugs prefer the apple or pear. Each day, a piece of clean, dry paper towel, folded was placed on the bottom of the container.. then the greens with the fruit. Then..to provide something to crawl on and hide.. another couple of pieces of paper towel are placed above the food area. Ladybugs need some moisture..which they get from the fresh fruit..though, I have read that a small water soaked ball of paper or a sponge will give the access to moisture... that said, I prefer offering fruit which is organic. Who knows the chemistry in paper manufacturing. Enjoy your little pals!

Anonymous said...

There are hundreds of lady bugs crawling around and piling up on my lawn , it has just reached freezing temperatures , is this where they are choosing to hibernate ? Looks like no more mowing this season

Fun Ladybug Game